Cardi Gallery

Ha-Chong Hyun, 2019, exhibition view, Cardi Gallery, Milan. Courtesy Cardi Gallery, Milan. Poto: Carlo Vannini

The Cardi Gallery was founded in Milan in 1972 by Renato Cardi.
In the late 1960s, Renato Cardi, with great foresight, began to collect works by artists such as Cy Twombly, Lucio Fontana, Piero Manzoni and Michelangelo Pistoletto, who were all relatively unknown at the time, thus building a prestigious collection ranging from Arte Povera to Spatialism and earning a reputation as a promoter for developing artists, having made an important contribution to launching many of their careers.

Now led by his son Nicolò, the gallery continues to shape the cultural landscape in Milan and abroad. In 2015, it opened its first venue abroad, expanding its presence in the London borough of Mayfair, the epicenter of the European art world. Both venues regularly host museum-quality exhibitions accompanied by an academic catalog or monograph with texts by eminent critics.

Dan Flavin, 2019, exhibition view, Cardi Gallery, Milan. Courtesy Cardi Gallery, Milan. Photo: Carlo Vannini

The Cardi Gallery exhibits every year at major international art fairs, focusing on masterpieces by Arte Povera, Minimalism and Zero Group artists.

The Cardi Gallery exhibits every year at major international art fairs, focusing on masterpieces by Arte Povera, Minimalism and Zero Group artists. The Cardi Gallery has helped build some of the most beautiful and historically important private collections in the world.

Shozo Shimamoto, 2020, exhibition view, Cardi Gallery, Milan. Courtesy Cardi Gallery, Milan. Photo: Carlo Vannini

“The happiest is the unbridled emotion one feels when acquiring a work of art, countered by an almost sad feeling when a work is sold.”
Nicolò Cardi. Courtesy Cardi Gallery. Photo: Carlo Vannini

In conversation with Nicolò Cardi, Cardi Gallery

What kind of art do you deal with?

The Galleria Cardi mostly deals with Arte Povera, Spatialism, Zero Group and Minimalism. I prioritise showing works from these movements, which I love and am deeply familiar with, in the exhibitions I organise at the gallery’s locations in Milan and London and at the international fairs. Over the years, the programme has expanded to include artists from all over the world belonging to movements that have something in common with ones the gallery is specialised in.

The most complicated and happiest moments of your career thus far?

The happiest is the unbridled emotion one feels when acquiring a work of art, countered by an almost sad feeling when a work is sold.

Are you a collector?

Far more than a gallerist.

What would be your desert-island work of art?

I prefer to stay in the fog of my beloved Milan.

Do you remember your first visit to an art gallery?

Sometimes I feel like I was born in a gallery. I grew up in the art world: my grandfather was a great art lover and my father opened his first gallery in Milan before I was born. I was always visiting galleries, artists’ studios, biennials, art fairs and, of course, museums.

Shozo Shimamoto, 2020, Cardi Gallery, Milan. Courtesy Cardi Gallery, Milan. Photo: Carlo Vannini
Read the full interview

Artists

  • Carl Andre
  • Giovanni Anselmo
  • Domenico Bianchi
  • Alighiero Boetti
  • Agostino Bonalumi
  • Alberto Burri
  • Daniel Buren
  • Alexander Calder
  • Pier Paolo Calzolari
  • Enrico Castellani
  • Ha Chong-Hyun
  • Nicola De Maria
  • Jean Dubuffet
  • Luciano Fabro
  • Dan Flavin
  • Lucio Fontana
  • Donald Judd
  • Jannis Kounellis
  • Sol LeWitt
  • Heinz Mack
  • Piero Manzoni
  • Agnes Martin
  • Fausto Melotti
  • Mario Merz
  • Marisa Merz
  • Mimmo Paladino
  • Giulio Paolini
  • Pino Pascali
  • Giuseppe Penone
  • Pino Pinelli
  • Michelangelo Pistoletto
  • Mimmo Rotella
  • Robert Ryman
  • Fred Sandback
  • Salvatore Scarpitta
  • Jan Schoonhoven
  • Richard Serra
  • Shozo Shimamoto
  • Antoni Tapies
  • Cy Twombly
  • Gunther Uecker
  • Giuseppe Uncini
  • Francesco Vezzoli
  • Andy Warhol
  • Claudio Verna
  • Gilberto Zorio