Galleria Franco Noero

Installation view, Jason Dodge, Coins and coffins under my bed, Galleria Franco Noero. © Sebastiano Pellion di Persano. Courtesy the artist and Galleria Franco Noero

Founded in Turin in 1999, the gallery distinguished itself from the very start for its courageous and significant exhibition projects crossing all artistic languages, while maintaining a particular attention to conceptual practices and to the radicality of research. Over the years, its program has maintained a constant evolution and growth, accompanied by the migration to eight different spaces in the city: a response to different architectural and planning needs, which has left artists free to create new projects in different places.

Installation view, Eric Nathaniel Mack, FELT, Galleria Franco Noero, Torino. © Sebastiano Pellion di Persano. Courtesy the artist and Galleria Franco Noero

Since 2013, its center of activity has been the area around Via Mottalciata 10, in the northern part of Turin: a ductile space, completed in September 2020 with an open-air area covering one thousand square meters located just a short distance from the main premises. Alongside the organization of exhibitions in its own spaces and participation in major international fairs, the gallery collaborates with the most important Italian and international institutions as well as with the city itself, promoting the publication of books and supporting and contributing to the production of works and projects by its artists.

Installation view, Jason Dodge, Coins and coffins under my bed, Galleria Franco Noero.
© Sebastiano Pellion di Persano. Courtesy the artist and Galleria Franco Noero
“The experiences we live with artists are all to be safeguarded as their most extreme and ethereal gestures, so beautiful and difficult to preserve.”
Pierpaolo Falone e Franco Noero. Courtesy Galleria Franco Noero, Torino

In conversation with Franco Noero, Galleria Franco Noero

How did your career in art begin?

When I was 14 years old, I went to see Ouverture at the Castello di Rivoli. For me it was phenomenal and it directed my curiosity towards contemporary art. I have a vivid memory of the tension in Giovanni Anselmo’s work, of the cryptic darkness of Joseph Beuys’ Olivestone, of Lothar Baumgarten’s room, which I scrutinized without understanding, even though I sensed the depth. It’s wonderful that I started working with Lothar, an artist who teaches us something extraordinary every day.

When and how did you open your gallery?

In 1998, I left Rome, where I had been working for three years with Sperone. I had begun to feel the need to dedicate myself to the artists that I began to follow. Seeing them grow I understood the urgency. I met Pierpaolo Falone there and we started an important dialogue. In 2006, he joined me in Turin and we finally became partners. Where would we open? Barbara lived in Turin, the Castello di Rivoli, the most important museum in Italy and also my favorite, was there, the Arte Povera movement was born and the ideas of its artists found support there over the years. It was three hours by car from Geneva, five hours by train from Paris, it had an airport with only a few flights, but enough to connect me with the world and I paid, for 35 square meters in the center of town, the equivalent of 80 euros a month.

Darren Bader, Rocks and Mirrors, 2015, Exhibition view, Galleria Franco Noero, Turin.
Courtesy the artist and Galleria Franco Noero, Turin. Photo: Sebastiano Pellion di Persano
Tell us about the space you chose for your gallery and the surrounding area.

Art annihilates places: perhaps that’s why in twenty-one years the gallery has migrated to eight different spaces, from the first small shop at the so-called “Fetta di Polenta” (Casa Scaccabarozzi) to the recently abandoned 18th-century apartment. Since 2013, our center has been the area of Via Mottalciata, in which Pierpaolo and I recognized the “blank canvas,” surprisingly adaptable, to offer each time to our artists. Soon we will complete this generous house with a garden, a 1,000-square-meter open air space just a short distance away.

Something important you’ve learned from an artist, and from a collector?

I can’t choose just one, I have so many memories about them! Working with artists is responsibility and privilege, it is a daily discovery.

Arturo Herrera, Soave sia il vento, 2016, exhibition view, Galleria Franco Noero, Turino.
Courtesy the artist and Galleria Franco Noero, Turin. Photo: Sebastiano Pellion di Persano
Are you a collector?

I have always been a serial accumulator of furniture, objects, books that I no longer know where to put. With art it’s different, eventually you see which works will actually remain on your hands.
The experiences we live with artists are all to be safeguarded as their most extreme and ethereal gestures, so beautiful and difficult to preserve.
Together with my wife, I own a very big sculpture…our special house in Turin!

Read the full interview

Artists

  • Darren Bader
  • Lothar Baumgarten
  • Pablo Bronstein
  • Tom Burr
  • Jeff Burton
  • Neil Campbell
  • Andrew Dadson
  • Jason Dodge
  • Sam Falls
  • Lara Favaretto
  • Martino Gamper
  • Mario García Torres
  • Henrik Håkansson
  • Mark Handforth
  • Arturo Herrera
  • Gabriel Kuri
  • Phillip Lai
  • Jim Lambie
  • Jac Leirner
  • Robert Mapplethorpe
  • Paulo Nazareth
  • Mike Nelson
  • Henrik Olesen
  • Kirsten Pieroth
  • Gabriel Sierra
  • Simon Starling
  • Tunga
  • Costa Vece
  • Francesco Vezzoli