Ancient or Contemporary, the Art in Little Lodi is Big

Marcello Maloberti, Platea, 2021, Lodi. Photo: T-space

A half-hour from Milan by train, Lodi is a small city that is absolutely worth the trip. An art and architecture day trip to be sure, but also perfect for nature lovers, thanks to the Adda Sud regional park and the Belgiardino nature reserve, and foodies: besides the different cheeses, I was especially fond of the rice cake at the Galbiati pastry shop.

Marcello Maloberti, Platea, 2021, Lodi
Marcello Maloberti, Platea, 2021, Lodi. Photo: T-space

In the centre of Lodi, in Corso Umberto I, one can see the exhibitions organised by the Platea art association in a display window created ad hoc in the seventeenth-century Palazzo Galeano. Founded this year, Platea supports young people through collaborations with established artists. The first of whom was Marcello Maloberti, who came up with the name for the project, wanting to “underline the importance of the public, gathered in the large auditorium (platea in Italian) that is the city of Lodi. And for me, the public is my body.”

Marcello Maloberti, Platea, 2021, Lodi
Marcello Maloberti, Platea, 2021, Lodi. Photo: T-space

All around this contemporary venue, the city centre preserves a grand art and architecture tradition. The Tempio dell’Incoronata is an obligatory stop for Renaissance art lovers, with frescoes by members of the Piazza family and a stunning gold and blue octagonal dome. Piazza della Vittoria, a rarity for its porticoes on all four sides, is a stunning sight, as is the stately Romanesque architecture of the cathedral. Overlooking Piazza Ospitale, the medieval church of San Francesco has two unusual double-lancet windows open to the blue of the sky. Here, in the Ospedale Vecchio, is the little-known Museo Paolo Gorini, featuring the eccentric scientist’s collection of experiments with anatomical preservation.

Tempio Civico della Beata Vergine Incoronata
Tempio Civico della Beata Vergine Incoronata, Lodi

Leaving the town centre in the direction of the railway station, you will find Renzo Piano’s headquarter’s for the Banca Popolare, with a glass and steel covered piazza featuring an infinity fountain by the Japanese artist Susumu Shingu.